What to Watch Now That the Jays are Gone

By: Nikolas Theodorakidis | @nikolastheo

It’s official: the long cold baseball-less winter is upon us.

Despite any amount of hope fans may have had, the Blue Jays were unable to rally back from a 3-0 deficit in the American League Championship Series last week.

But the end of the baseball season means we can now turn our collective attention to the other teams in this city. And, for what it’s worth, this is turning out to be as good a winter in Toronto as we’ve had in a few years.

Raptors

Let’s start with Toronto’s most successful team as of late. The Raptors ended last year on a high having made it to the Eastern Conference Finals for the first time in franchise history. Although the team was outmatched by the Cleveland Cavaliers, there was some joy found in taking two games from the eventual champs in between four blowout losses. Winning a playoff series was the main goal last year, and, though they struggled to do so, they won two of them.

This year, gauging the team’s success might be a bit more difficult.

A repeat trip to the Eastern Conference Finals would be appreciated but can hardly be expected. Multiple teams in the East have improved in the offseason, including division rivals Boston and New York, so the Raptors shouldn’t be considered a lock for anything like last year.  But a first round elimination would feel like a step backwards for a team that overcame so much in terms of shaking the franchise’s monkeys off their backs.

Perhaps the team’s success will be determined by the actual product on court, rather than the mile markers the team passes on their way to being eliminated. The team, and particularly newly minted Olympic Gold Medallists Kyle Lowry and DeMar DeRozan, have been criticized for playing “hero ball” in the past that has been a detriment to the team. If the team can play in a more effective way – one that doesn’t leave fans burying their face in their free giveaway t-shirt – elimination won’t feel as bad and might provide more hope for the future.

Leafs

The Leafs have not been must-see TV for a few years now. If you opened up the fridge of Toronto sports and all you saw was the Leafs, you’d complain that there was nothing to eat. But this year’s version of the Buds is already way more appetizing.

The only thing the Leafs have won in recent memory was the draft lottery at the end of last season. With that came the arrival of Auston Matthews. The 18-year-old American centre has been anointed the saviour of the Leafs and so far, he’s lived up to the high praise. In his first NHL game, Matthews scored four goals, a feat that had never been accomplished before by anyone in their first game.

And he’s not the only youngster getting in on the action. Mitch Marner has also been turning heads, notching three points through five games, including a great goal against Boston in the Leafs home opener. And William Nylander has nine points through six games, including a two-goal night against Chicago this past Saturday.

Unfortunately, the goal scoring has not led to success for the Leafs as of yet. They have just one win this season and have blown third period games in four of their six games so far this season. But at least they are starting to look relevant again, right? A team that scores goals but can’t prevent them is more enjoyable than the opposite any day of the week.

Toronto FC

And finally, we have TFC. The butt of many jokes in Toronto sports, TFC have actually put together their most successful season to date. Gaining a franchise high 53 points, the Reds have secured a home playoff match for the first time in the team’s history. They will take on the Philadelphia Union on Wednesday night at BMO Field in a win-or-go-home match with a spot on the Eastern Conference semi-finals on the line.

Once again, it has been a spectacular season for Sebastian Giovinco. If it wasn’t clear after his first season with the club, we can say for sure that he is the best player in team history after his second. He scored 17 goals and racked 15 assists without even playing a game in September.

A win on Wednesday and a somewhat deep playoff run could finally give TFC their fair share of the media attention. It’s hard to think that a team sitting near the top of their conference for most of their season and an MVP candidate on their roster – kind of like the Blue Jays of the last two years – would be relegated to the middle of the sports section or to the latter part of a Sportscentre broadcast, but that’s where TFC often find themselves. TFC have the best chance to bring the city a championship and deserve to be treated that way.

Featured image via Toronto Star

Should I Take a Second Language as an Elective?

By: Neya Abdi | @neyaabdi

Most discussions about electives revolve around two main questions:

  1. Is it easy?
  2. Will it make me more attractive to employers?

To be honest, the best approach to electives is taking courses you are interested in. You are more likely to show up, do the work, and find practical applications for the course material when you care about it. But I digress.

Conversations around electives routinely involve a discussion on the value of the elective. It’s a course you don’t have to take, so if you’re going to take it it should either boost up your CGPA or help you win jobs post-graduation.

Learning another language satisfies two of the most worthy considerations we’ve mentioned: it’s both lucrative and it’s a course that can be enjoyable. While learning a second (or third or fourth) language requires work, it can also be rewarding and impressive giving students more incentive to pursue it.

There are Thousands of Languages in the World – Which One Should I Learn First?

There are more than 6,500 spoken languages in the world, but roughly 2000 of those languages have no more than 1000 speakers. Of the remaining languages, only a few are offered at the university level.

French is one of the most popular languages for native English speakers to learn. Before English took over the global scene, French was the superstar. Today, it is still one of the official languages of a number of prominent international institutions (the United Nations being one of them). It also holds the cute title as the “language of love”.

For Canadians, learning French carries special importance. As one of our two official languages there is much to be gained from learning French in terms of employability. Those interested in a career in public service likely already know that the federal government is the largest employer in the country. And many other industries are increasingly interested in landing candidates who are English/French bilingual.

Look to Your Desired Industry and Your Interests When Choosing a Language To Learn

Of course, there may be some readers who are uninterested in the french language or who have no intentions of finding work in a field that requires French/English bilingualism. In that case, what are the best languages to learn?

There are several factors you should take into consideration in this case. Interested in pursuing a career in international affairs, global security, or energy? Arabic may be the language you want to pick up. There are numerous non-commercial reasons to learn Arabic, including its beautiful script and rich history. From an economic perspective it can also be a very lucrative language to learn considering our contemporary geopolitical climate.

But sometimes it is not just about the commercial benefits of a language. For instance, there has been growing conversation about the benefits of learning Mandarin. Some parents are rushing to put their children into schools that teach Mandarin to make them more competitive in a world that is witnessing China’s growth as a superpower. Other observers caution that parents (and students) shouldn’t be so hasty.

While there is some disagreement, the consensus is that Mandarin is a notoriously difficult language for native English speakers to learn to speak (and even more difficult to learn how to write). In an article for the Harvard Crimson, Jorge A. Araya talks about how the cost of learning Mandarin will likely lead to a global situation where native Mandarin speakers are more likely to pick up English. While the actual difficulty of learning Mandarin could be argued back and forth (difficult for whom, exactly?) sinologist David Moser confirms how tough the language is in his hilarious, slightly bitter article “Why Chinese is so Damn Hard” that tackles the linguistic and cultural gap between East and West. In the case of Mandarin, students must have a distinct interest in learning the language because purely monetary motivation will only get them so far.

Languages Are Fun and Rewarding to Learn, Whatever the Motivation

Then again if ease is what you are looking for, consider learning how to habla espanol. For English speakers, it is considered an extremely easy language to learn. The shared cognates and the relatively simple grammatical rules make the language accessible. And Spanish just sounds sexy, even when you can barely speak it, so the motivation to become fluent will be extra strong.

Whichever language you choose to take, selecting any language as an elective is a great choice to make. Learning how to communicate with a million (or in the case of Mandarin, a billion) more people than you could with only your mother tongue is a beautiful thing. And a nice way to supplement a well-rounded, global education.

10 Solid Strategies for Beating Study-Stress

By: Francesca Kennedy | @FrancescaK_GL

With the beautiful fall colours inevitably arrives the dreaded midterm season. It’s overwhelming, and always comes much sooner that you think it will. However, there are ways to manage and even overcome this pressure. With a little practice, this stressful season gets easier.

Sleep

Late night study sessions tear deeply into important sleep time. It may seem like the assignment is your first priority, but your health should always come first.

Train yourself to put down assignments at a cut off time like midnight, and set a morning alarm to start working again. If worse comes to worse, look at the late penalties and weigh it against the quality of your writing. Is it worth getting no sleep and handing in an average paper on time, or a solid sleep and a great mark with a minimal late penalty?

Eat (mostly) Right

Keeping on the health theme, eating right will also help you manage that study stress. Eating high-protein meals will help boost your energy levels. For snacking, turn to fruits and vegetables. Preparation in advance is key to making sure you don’t slip and order pizza for the third night in a row.

That being said, everyone deserves motivational awards, so keep a box of your favourite cookies on hand for those pick-me-up moments.

Take Study Breaks

Some people follow the 50 minute work, 10 minute break rule. Others the 10 minute work 50 minute break rule. While the latter may not be so productive, study breaks are essential to keeping yourself sane and de-stressed. Walk your dog, go out to your local Tim Hortons for a coffee. Anything to get a change of scenery.

Be Visual

Different planning tools work for different people, but having a clear visual reminder of the work you need to do helps you plan your time and avoid procrastination. Calendars hung over your desk or to-do lists posted on your fridge are something physical to remind yourself to work. I would also avoid using electronic to-do lists or calendars in this case. Even though you can set alerts and reminders, it is easy to click “ignore” or simply not open the app.

Prioritize

The key to surviving midterm season is prioritization. Look at your list of assignments, and deconstruct them. Factors you may want to consider are:

Due dates: Which assignment is due first?

Assignment length: A 15 page paper may need an early start date more than a 5 page paper.

Assignment content: Is it research-based? A report? Opinion-based? Certain types of work require more or less time. Plan accordingly.

Group work: Group assignments inevitably take longer than planned.

Don’t forget to always allow for more time than you need!

Stay Active

Sitting at a desk writing all day is not good for you. Even if you don’t go to the gym or enjoy running, take five minutes every now and then to go for a walk. Wander around the neighbourhood or even pace around the house to alleviate writer’s block and avoid that stiff neck you’ll get tomorrow.

Get Social

Midterm season often translates to students locking themselves in their rooms, pouring over a pile of textbooks. Humans aren’t meant to be away from others for long periods of time. If you have group projects, try to meet up rather than use group chat, go visit a friend, or even phone your parents and talk about non-school related topics.

Find Space

This one is hard if you’re living in residence or a bachelor apartment, but well worth the effort. Try to separate your study space from your social or sleep space. Don’t work in or next to your bed because your stress will seep into other aspects of your life. Go to the library, use a study room, or even try a coffee shop for some distance.

Be Health-Proactive

Check in with yourself. Learn to recognize destructive stress patterns and find solutions that work for you. Mood-monitoring apps are a great way to do this, but so is simply having some “down-time”. Buy a book that is completely unrelated to your courses, download a new album, and dedicate some time each day to relaxing.

Celebrate

Midterm season is long and overwhelming, so don’t forget to celebrate each little accomplishment! Each step is a progression towards your success. Met your reading goal? Page goal? Assignment complete? Take a moment to give yourself the praise you deserve, and maybe one of those cookies you bought earlier.

Why You Shouldn’t Jump Off the Jays’ Bandwagon Yet

By: Nikolas Theodorakidis | @nikolastheo

This weekend was not great for the Toronto Blue Jays.

The Jays scored one run in 18 innings in the two games in Cleveland, going 0-5 with runners in scoring position in Game One and going hitless after the third inning in Game Two. They squandered solid starts from Marco Estrada and J.A. Happ along the way. Both pitchers gave up two earned runs, falling victim to timely hits from Cleveland second baseman Francisco Lindor.

The team now faces the same scenario they faced in the American League Championship Series last year: coming home down two games to none. As Ben Nicholson-Smith of Sportsnet points out, 27 teams have fallen behind 0-2 in a League Championship Series and only three have advanced.

So, yeah, not great.

But, let’s not give up on the boys of summer just yet. There are more than enough reasons to believe that this season is not over.

Pitching

When it comes to the pitching matchups, you’d have to think the Jays have the advantage for the next two games.

Game Three has Marcus Stroman pitching for the Jays against Cleveland’s Trevor Bauer. Bauer and his 4.26 ERA were supposed to pitch in Game Two but he injured his finger—and this is true—fixing his drone. On paper, it would seem Stroman, coming off a good start in the Wild Card game, would be better than someone with an ERA higher than four and has stitches in his finger.

And Aaron Sanchez will take to the mound for the Jays in Game Four against Mike Clevinger, who is starting because of injury to two other Cleveland pitchers. Sanchez did not look great in his last start but should still be favoured over a pitcher that only started 10 games during the regular season.

Home Sweet Home

A return home might give the Jays offence a much needed boost.

As a team, the Jays have hit .260/.341/.444 at the Rogers Centre this year, but only .236/.318/.408 on the road. The team who has suddenly seen their offensive production suddenly disappear will be happy to return to their notoriously hitter friendly ballpark.

None will be happier than Jose Bautista. He struck out five times in eight plate appearances in the last two games and has voiced his displeasure with the strike zone so far in the series. While still uncharacteristically high for him, Bautista has struck out less at home this year than on the road and will be looking to have some of his power return.

Well, If It Happened Last Year…

While it may not mean much, the Jays were in this position last year.

In the third game of the ALCS last year, the Jays returned home after only scoring two runs in Kansas City. The Jays scored 11 runs and Marcus Stroman picked up the win. Who’s to say a similar result isn’t in order this time around?

And this year, the Jays don’t have to rely on R.A. Dickey in Game Four. Dickey gave up five runs in that game last year, but this year the Jays will have Sanchez, their ace, to carry them into a Game Five. A Game Five that will feature Marco Estrada starting for the Jays…just like last year. If you ask me, things are lining up too perfectly.

While things aren’t great for the Jays, it’s not all doom and gloom. So don’t despair, Toronto, the boys of summer still have a shot this fall.

Featured image via CBC News

Jays Look to Seize the Moment One Year After Bat Flip

By: Nikolas Theodorakidis | @nikolastheo

October 14, 2015 holds a special place in the hearts of Toronto sports fans. It was on this day that Jose Bautista took a 1-1 pitch from Texas Rangers reliever Sam Dyson deep into the left field seats, lifting the Blue Jays to a series win in the American League Divisional Series. He paused and watched it leave the park for a moment before throwing his bat in the air and rounding the bases. When speaking to anyone about it, you just have to say “the Bat Flip” and they know what you’re talking about.

That moment meant a lot to a franchise that had not seen the postseason or much of any important baseball since the back to back World Series wins in 1992 and 1993. Fans who were in diapers or had yet to be born—like myself—finally had a memory to tell future generations about.

What was even better about that game was that it numbed the pain of Toronto’s eventual elimination to Kansas City in the following round. Toronto blew a lead in Game Two of that series and got shellacked in Game Four at home. But who cared? That could not take the Bat Flip away from us.

And here we are, a year later, with the Jays in a similar position. Having eliminated the Texas Rangers once again, they kick off the American League Championship Series tonight against Cleveland. Already this year, we have new stories to tell. Edwin Encarnacion’s walk off home run in the American League Wildcard game and Josh Donaldson’s dash for home plate in Game Three of the Divisional Series were incredible finishes to incredible games. However, one would have to imagine that they will not be enough to get the fan base through the long, hard winter this time around.

There is too much uncertainty surrounding the team to have fans react the same way they did last year.

At least eight members of the Blue Jays will be entering free agency this offseason, including Bautista and Encarnacion, two players that have been mainstays in the Jays offence for years and are regarded as two of the franchise’s all-time greats.

There is a very real chance that all eight of those players will be gone next year, leaving this team looking a lot different and quite possibly a whole lot less competitive. If that happens, and this team fails to play at the level they did this year, those great moments and warm feelings might not be enough to escape the feeling that this was a wasted opportunity.

With that said, there are enough positives with this team to think that they won’t squander this.

For one, the troubles the team ran into in the playoffs last year have come and gone already. The team went 13-16 in September and lost their lead in the American League East, but have bounced back and gone undefeated in six October games. The starting pitching has fewer questions than it did this time last year, and the offence looks as potent as ever.

Coupled with that, their opponent is hurting. Cleveland will be without Carlos Carrasco and Danny Salazar, two starting pitchers that would have made the Jays road to a championship a lot more difficult.

A lot of things are going the Jays way at this point, even more than when they were setting the baseball world on fire last year. And for the sake of the fans and a franchise that does not know what coming years might look like, hopefully the moments we have been given in the past will not be the final ones.

Featured image via SB Nation

How to Cheer for Toronto Teams on a Budget

If there’s one thing the last year has shown us, it’s that Toronto teams are working hard to make their fans proud.

But team pride and coming together means a lot of bars and, you guessed it, high bar tabs. And when you have an entire city getting hammered with you in the name of team spirit, blowing money on drinks somehow seems justified.

But it really isn’t, and your bank does not offer city pride rebates. Being smart with your money while supporting Toronto teams doesn’t mean you have to sit at home with a meal of bread and water while you wait for updates on the radio. You can definitely feel the team spirit without forcing your wallet to feel it, too.

Read the Drink Specials and Spend Accordingly

Even if you are not a big sports fan, any bar when a Toronto team is in the playoffs is infectious. Some might say this is being a bandwagoner. I call it having a good time. But that doesn’t mean you have to order the most expensive items. Take a moment to read over the drink specials. Hell, you might find you like something different (and cheap!) And even if you insist on getting your usual, you can search for drink specials based on day and drink online. 

Sip Slowly – Your Drink Isn’t Going Anywhere

If you are somebody who feels anxious about the server coming over and asking you if you want another drink, sip slowly. They are busy, and they are about their tips. So long as your glass isn’t empty they have nothing to say to you aside from a routine quality check to “see how everything’s going”. Nurse your drink. That way you won’t feel tempted to order multiple rounds just to have something in front of you throughout the evening.

Order Appetizers and See If Anyone Else Just Wants Something To Nibble On

Do a quick survey of your friends to see if people are actually hungry. Most of the time people just want something to nibble on, but convince themselves they should order a full meal. If your appetite is not feeling up to a $15 burger, ask if anyone wants to split an appetizer. Apps are less expensive, and if you are splitting it with someone it will be even cheaper.

Pick a Few Evenings to Be a Teetotaler

You are a hard core “Toronto til the death of me” sports fan who needs to watch virtually every game in a bar surrounded by your people. It’s cool. So choose a few nights to be a temporary teetotaler. Pick a few games where you just don’t drink. Even if you grab some food, your bill will still be significantly lower than a bill that includes several rounds. Your liver thanks you.

Find That Friend With Cable and Parents Who Don’t Give a Damn

I don’t think anyone with their own apartment who is under the age of 25 has cable, but this is Toronto, people. That means a large number of your friends or classmates are from the city or the suburbs and are commuters. You know what this means: houses owned by old people (love you, parents!) with cable. Now, most of those people will have parents who do not want a bunch of rowdy sports fans tearing up their living room, but there is always one with parents cool about it – or at least a friend who is willing to risk a cussing from their parents.

Buy some stuff from the grocery store, make an LCBO run, and watch the game without paying restaurant premiums. Thank their mom on the way out. Don’t spill anything.

Order a Pitcher

Go out with people who like the same drinks as you, and then order a pitcher. If you’re gonna spend money drinking, might as well be in bulk.

AND REMEMBER: Don’t drive drunk. Better passed out on the TTC than dead or a murderer. Cheers xo

Why Students Should Eat The Same Lunch Every Day

By: Neya Abdi | @neyaabdi

Everyone loves lunch. It’s a teasing taste of the freedom that’s gonna come at the end of our shift or after a long day of lectures. But there’s something to be said for deciding to eat the same thing for lunch…every day.

It Makes Packing Lunches and Eating Healthier Easier

Once you’ve created a meal – with all the food groups! – that you like and enjoy eating regularly, packing lunches and eating healthy becomes easier. You gain an increased awareness of the foods you’re consuming since you’re throwing the bare ingredients together yourself. By knowing exactly what to grab from the grocery store each week and developing a quick and easy method for preparing your food either the night before or the morning of, the process will become as automatic as brushing your teeth or hopping into the shower. (Assuming you do those things…hopefully.)

Working Over Lunch Becomes Much More Efficient

If you have a go go go mentality and like to get readings done during your lunch, you will appreciate this reason. First of all, keeping yourself fed and energized is an important part of being productive, so skipping lunch to squeeze in an extra hour of studying is not a sustainable strategy. The most productive students know this and respect their body’s needs. That being said, you can still make your lunch hour as streamlined as possible by cutting down on the amount of time you spend thinking about what you’re going to eat.

Alexa von Tobel, founder and CEO of LearnVest, told Lifehacker that she eats the same thing for lunch every single day (and breakfast too for that matter!)

I try to automate all tasks that truly do not require energy. For instance, I basically eat the same breakfast and lunch every day (dinner is my fun meal). Why waste time on figuring out what I want to pick up for lunch? I know what I like, and I stick to it.

The 32 year old multimillionaire is a Harvard grad, entrepreneur, CEO, and New York Times Bestselling Author – you’d better believe she knows something about using your time wisely.

You Can Spend Less Time Thinking About What To Eat and Enjoy Your Lunch Break Instead

Remember when someone took that intense scene from The Notebook (where Noah repeatedly asks Allie, “What do you want?”) and captioned it, “Every time I ask my girl what she wants to eat…“? Whoever made that video was speaking the truth – for both girls and boys. Figuring out what you want to eat can take forever, especially when you are presented with a lot of options. And by the time you’re done making your selection (likely one of two meals you always get) and have made your way through the long line you’re only left with a little time to scarf down your food before getting back to your classes feeling like you only had a ten minute break. Spend less time staring at lunch specials and more time doing what you want with your break.

You Will Save A Lot of Money Eating The Same Thing Every Day

If you care nothing about productivity or even healthy eating, perhaps a plea from your wallet will have you seeing things differently. Instead of running to the cafeteria or going out for lunch in between classes, you can satisfy your hunger with the easy meal you put together. We spend A LOT of money eating out. A 2012 study by Visa found that Canadians who buy their lunch three times a week at an average cost of $8.80 per meal spend $1,500 a year.

That’s tuition for two classes, a round trip ticket to Europe, or at least a bad ass wardrobe. Pack a lunch.

Your Cooking Skills Will Improve

It sounds counter-intuitive, doesn’t it? If you’re making the exact same thing for lunch every single day, shouldn’t your cooking skills get worse or plateau? On the contrary, witnessing the positive results of eating the same meal every day – on your finances, on your health, and on your productivity – will make you more curious about how you can make additions or alterations to your meal. The success you’ve already experienced provides more incentive to try.

Eating the same thing for lunch every day sounds like a bland way to live, but you’d be surprised at how much time we waste deciding to eat the same three things we always do. Your life is way more exciting than what you eat at 12 o’clock and the benefits of grabbing the same salad and chicken each day may leave you wondering why you didn’t try this sooner.

Featured Image courtesy of Unsplash

How to Stay Motivated Past The First Month of School

“People often say that motivation doesn’t last. Well, neither does bathing – that’s why we recommend it daily.” – Zig Ziglar

If I could come up with an object or solution with magical properties it wouldn’t be an elixir that preserves youth, an oil that prevents hair loss, or a stone that turns metal to gold.

You know what I’d develop? Motivation in a bottle.

Can you imagine? If we could take that combination of hope, fearlessness, and drive that consumes us before New Year, at the start of the school year, or after great words of encouragement and turn it into a perfume we could spray on at will we’d be doing some great things – like writing multiple drafts of our essays.

But until an adorable nerd somewhere whips up this magical concoction we are forced to stick with tried and true methods to do the hard work required to accomplish our goals. Here are a few strategies to keep you grinding well past mid-terms.

Maintain a Neat Work Environment

Your physical surroundings have a significant impact on your mental state. Have you ever decided you were going to go home and tackle a reading only to remember the mess waiting for you? That image instantly drains your energy and convinces you that you can’t get to work until you clean. So you turn on music, start cleaning, look around at all the clothes to hang up, sink to the floor and mumble, “Nope.”

There’s no need to aim to become a domestic god or goddess. Commit 15 minutes each day to picking up everything off the floor. A little bit goes a long way, especially when it comes to cleaning. As you witness the tremendous impact a small amount of cleaning every day has, you will become more motivated to develop a rigorous cleaning schedule and by extension, get things done in your work space.

Attend Every Class (Even If You Can Get Away With Skipping)

When 3 out of 4 of your professors are just reading slides off a screen, it’s hard to find the motivation to drag your butt to their 9am class. In theory, you could read all the slides later and show up for the exams, but the key words there are “in theory”.

As the number of slides to catch up on grows larger and larger, the amount of work you’re faced with will get even more overwhelming. You’d be surprised at how much you can absorb by simply showing up. And even if you do wind up slacking on the readings, when you eventually decide to tackle the syllabus and play catch-up, you won’t be starting from nothing.

And remember: you picked these classes for a reason. With the exception of a few pesky mandatory classes, you chose these lectures because the subject matter seemed interesting. Follow up with that initial curiosity by attending.

Stop Joking About How Lazy You Are

It’s as simple as this: if you keep saying you’re lazy, you are going to act lazy. If you spend time joking with your friends about what a bum you are, you will cultivate a social group within which self-pity is acceptable and poor performance is not embarrassing. If you do nothing else on this list, start telling yourself that you are a hard worker and that you get shit done, even if it is not true in the moment. Your actions will catch up with your words.

Set Micro-goals to Make Your Larger Goals Manageable

Saying “I will get an A in all of my classes this semester” is a lovely statement, but it lacks something important: a plan. If you made this same goal last semester and you didn’t get the marks you desired, consider what behaviours brought you up short.

Was it often difficult for you to get started leading to procrastination and then hastily submitted work?

Instead of deciding you will spend every evening in the library, commit to spending at least ten minutes on a given activity. Reading an article. Studying a chapter. Even cleaning your room. Promise yourself if you can perform that activity for ten straight minutes, you can watch Netflix or go out, guilt-free. Chances are after ten minutes, you’ll be on a roll and hesitant to slow your momentum. If you feel your thoughts drifting to social media or your phone, tell yourself you can look at it in ten minutes (or five if the itch is particularly strong).

When the chemical engineer and the botanist I’m keeping – uh, hosting – in my basement finalize the formula for liquid motivation, I’ll hit you all up with some prices. In the meantime…

GET TO WORK!